Driving Licence Points


Driving Licence Points And What You Should Do

Driving licence points system is one in which a driver’s licensing authority, police force, or other organization issues cumulative demerits, or driving licence points to drivers on conviction for road traffic offences  Points may either be added or subtracted, depending on the particular system in use. A major offence may lead to more than the maximum allowed points being issued.

Driving licence points are typically applied after  Read more

Section 172 Road Traffic Act


Section 172 Road Traffic Act 1988

Section 172  road traffic act requires the registered keeper of a vehicle to supply the identity of a driver. Section 172 road traffic act notices should not be ignored, so read on.

If you fail to do this then the penalty is 6 points and a fine of up to £1,000. The court also has the power to impose a driving ban but rarely uses it preferring 6 points and large fines instead.

The police have 14 days to serve the registered keeper with an Read more

Motorists Charged With Drug Driving


Drink driving and the legal alcohol limit

Do

Drink Driving if you are pulled over you should answer the officer’s questions honestly and accurately. Some of the questions the officer will ask you are for your benefit. If the officer asks if you have had an alcoholic drink over the past twenty minutes he/she is actually telling you that he will have to wait for twenty minutes before he carries out a test. This is because an officer has to wait until any residual traces of that alcohol which could affect the machine are gone. The same goes for any consumption such as food, smoking or using inhalers etc.

Don’t

Be obstructive. The officers are only doing their job which they will carry on with regardless of a person’s attitude. Most officers will try their best to make the process a smooth one for you but they also have the means to Read more

Section 172


Section 172 of the 1988 Road Traffic Act

Section 172 of the 1988 Road Traffic Act requires the registered keeper of a vehicle to supply the identity of a driver. Section 172 notices should not be ignored, so read on.

If you fail to do this then the penalty is 6 points and a fine of up to £1,000. The court also has the power to impose a driving ban but rarely uses it preferring 6 points and large fines instead.

The police have 14 days to serve the registered keeper with an NIP. If they don’t then the driver may have a defence to the offence that they are accused of. But this 14 day rule does not apply to Read more

Penalty Points, Endorsements And Rules for New Drivers


When you’ve passed your re-test

Rules for new drivers You will  lose your licence if you run up another 6 points. But if you get more than 12 points in 3 years, you’ll normally lose your licence for at least 6 months.

Penalty points on your provisional licence

The Rules for new drivers, You can also get penalty points on your provisional licence before you pass your test. These points last for 3 years. If you then get more points after passing your test taking the total to 6 you’ll lose your licence.

If you reach 6 points before you’ve taken your test, you won’t lose your provisional licence. But if you get any more points within 2 years of passing your test, you’ll Read more

Been Caught Using a Mobile Phone While Driving


USING A MOBILE PHONE WHILE DRIVING

Anyone caught using their mobile phone whilst driving now receives three penalty points on their license and a £60 fine. Points can mean higher insurance costs.

This new legislation means that if your case goes to Court the fine could increase to £1000 or £2500 for drivers of vans, lorries and coaches. Effectively this means drivers can now end up losing their licence for using their mobile while driving.

You don’t have to be caught many times to be disqualified. If you get just six points in the first two years after passing your test, you will lose Read more

Motorists warned about snow on car roofs


Snow on car roofs

While there is no specific legislation regarding snow on cars, drivers could be responsible if it causes an accident.

“If it slips over the windscreen, or flies into the path of another car, it could leave the driver open to being penalised for driving without due care and attention or careless or inconsiderate driving,” North Yorkshire Police said in a statement.

“Any snow left on vehicle bodywork, such as the bonnet or roof, could slide onto lights or windows causing dangerous obstruction to vision of the driver or signals to other road users.”

“Snow could also slide from a moving vehicle and onto a footpath or roadway possibly causing danger or injury to other road users or pedestrians.”

snow

Rule 229 of the Highway Code states, in a section entitled ‘driving in adverse weather conditions’, that snow should be removed from your car.

The full rule says: ‘Before you set off you MUST be able to see, so clear all snow and ice from all your windows. You MUST ensure that lights are clean and number plates are clearly visible and legible, make sure the mirrors are clear and the windows are demisted thoroughly.

‘Remove all snow that might fall off into the path of other road users. Check your planned route is clear of delays and that no further snowfalls or severe weather are predicted.’

Read more please Click Here

Before you set off

you MUST be able to see, so clear all snow and ice from all your windows

you MUST ensure that lights are clean and number plates are clearly visible and legible

make sure the mirrors are clear and the windows are demisted thoroughly

remove all snow that might fall off into the path of other road users

check your planned route is clear of delays and that no further snowfalls or severe weather are predicted.
Laws CUR reg 30, RVLR reg 23, VERA sect 43 & RV(DRM)R reg 11

potential undue care and attention offence

Rule 230 of the Highway Code

When driving in icy or snowy weather, drive with care, even if the roads have been treated, keep well back from the road user in front as stopping distances can be ten times greater than on dry roads.

Take care when overtaking vehicles spreading salt or other de-icer, particularly if you are riding a motorcycle or cycle.

Watch out for snowploughs which may throw out snow on either side. Do not overtake them unless the lane you intend to use has been cleared. Be prepared for the road conditions to change over relatively short distances.

Listen to travel bulletins and take note of variable message signs that may provide information about weather, road and traffic conditions ahead.

Contravening traffic sign such as going through a red traffic light


Contravening Traffic Sign

Contravening traffic sign offence covers a number of situations such as going through a red light, contravening double white lines, give way, no entry and one way signs.

Any signs, wherever they are placed must comply with the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 and if they do not, then a person contravening them commits no offence. The Regulations are very detailed. They give precise dimensions which must be strictly observed by the Highways Authority. Failure to do so provides a defence, however minor the deviation from the Read more

Judge calls for jail sentence for dangerous driving


A Bradford judge has called for the introduction of a ‘three strikes and you’re out’ policy that would send dangerous driving straight to prison after committing the same offence three times.

Dangerous Driving

Judge Jonathan Durham Hall QC made these proposals after he heard the case of James Mellor, 25, who had been caught dangerous driving for the fifth time. The judge remanded the offender in custody for one week while he decided whether to give the man a community sentence or to send him to Read more